Guitar Parts


FREE
guitar body

Body

Guitar Parts
The Body (bɑ́di) is the largest part of the guitar. For the acoustic guitar, the body is a chamber that amplifies the vibration created by the strings into acoustic sound. Different acoustic guitars require different body shapes and materials which is key to determining the unique qualities of a guitar’s sound. The body of an electric guitar is made of a single solid piece of wood. With electric guitars, the body is mainly a functional space used to hold the strings, pickups, vibrato, tremolo bar and volume knobs. The body of an electric guitar needs to be solid and durable enough to hold its components. Due to it's composition the solid body of an electric guitar does not shape its sound as much as an acoustic guitar. 
...Read More

FREE
Guitar bridge

Bridge

Guitar Parts
The Bridge (brɪ́ǰ) is the piece of the guitar that holds the strings to the body of the guitar and provides a base upon which vibrations bounce before being transmitted into sound. The bridge is positioned perpendicular in relation to the strings and can affect both a guitar's tone and pitch. Typically constructed from a single piece of wood, the bridge is generally fixed in place. Although some electric guitars utilize a tremolo bridge, which is metal and can be easily adjusted, most bridges are fixed in place and should only be adjusted by a luthier (guitar expert).
...Read More

FREE
Bridge Pins

Bridge Pins

Guitar Parts
Bridge Pins (brɪ́ǰ pɪ́nz) are small parts used on acoustic guitars to attach one end of the guitar's strings to the body of the guitar. One end of the string has a ball typically composed of brass that fit into the holes in the bridge of the guitar next to the sound hole. A bridge pin has a smaller end that pushes the string end further into the hole, and secures the string tightly with their larger end, which is too big to be pushed entirely through the bridge. Bridge pins are made of bone or synthetic materials and help to place the strings accurately across the plane of the guitar neck, and are usually about an inch long.
...Read More

FREE

French Polish

Guitar Parts
French Polish (frɛ́nč pɑ́lɪš) is a concoction of mainly alcohol, shellac (a by-product of the lac beetle), pumice and virgin olive oil that is used to add an intense shine to a guitar's neck, head and body. French polishing a guitar will bring out the luster and protect the surface of the instrument. This type of finish is time and labor intensive, as it requires the right ratio of ingredients and takes time to apply in a slow and even fashion. In more detail, French polish needs to rubbed on in many thin layers in a circle-like motion.
...Read More

FREE
fretboard

Fretboard

Guitar Parts
The Fretboard (frɛ́tbɔ́rd) is also known as a fingerboard, which is the part of the guitar used to change the tones made by plucked or strummed strings. Located on the front of a guitar's neck, fretboards are generally made of rosewood but can be made from a variety of other woods. As the length (and thickness) of the string are what determines its tone, pressing a vibrating string against the frets laid into the fretboard changes the effective length of the string being played. This is how the tone of a string is changed. A fretboard is common to almost all stringed instruments, not all of which are fretted. Most guitars, both electric and acoustic, have at least twenty two frets on their fretboard. Only twelve frets are actually needed, at a minimum, because that is the number needed to produce one full octave per string.
...Read More

FREE
Guitar frets

Frets

Guitar Parts
Frets (frɛ́ts) are small metal bars on the neck or body of the guitar that are used to alter the pitch of a string. The frets shorten the vibrating length of the string when a finger presses the string against an individual fret, an action called “stopping.” Doing this makes the pitch higher. The frets are also used to show the player where the string should be stopped. In higher quality acoustic guitars, the fingerboard along that the frets are placed usually joins the body of the guitar at the twelfth or fourteenth fret. Guitar frets are often made of metal, and the fingerboard of rosewood or ebony, a denser and harder wood. Unlike the guitar, some string instruments have no frets (IE: violin), which requires the musician to know precisely where to stop the string. In this case, the string will vibrate from the bridge to the fret below the point where the finger is pressed.
...Read More

FREE
gain knob

Gain Knob

Guitar Parts
Gain (gén) is a measure of how much amplification is applied to an audio signal. Gain is generally expressed in decibels. Most guitar amplifiers have a gain knob. As gain is increased, it will create distortion as the signal becomes louder than the equipment can handle cleanly. Electric guitar players desire certain types of distortion, so most guitar amplifiers are designed to increase desirable distortion as the gain is increased.
...Read More

FREE
amplifier head

Head (Amplifier)

Guitar Parts
The Head (hɛ́d) of an amplifier refers to a stand-alone portion of a guitar amplifier setup, which contains the pre-amp and power amplifier sections, but not speakers. An electric guitar is plugged into the wood or metal-enclosed head, which in turn is plugged into the speaker cabinet. The head is responsible for the pre-amp stage of the guitar signal, which usually contains controls for gain and tone, which then feeds into the power amp stage, which is responsible for volume output to the speakers. The head is usually placed above one or two stacked speaker cabinets. This configuration is referred to as a "half-stack" or "stack," as opposed to a "combo" amplifier which contains the pre- and post-amp, including a speaker(s), within a single cabinet.
...Read More

FREE
headstock

Headstock (Head)

Guitar Parts
The headstock (headstock) or "head" of the guitar is the part of the guitar located at the very end of the instrument’s neck. This part of the guitar's anatomy, as it holds the tuning pegs and tuning posts, is where the tensions on the stings are adjusted. Some headstock form a flat continuous surface with the body of the instrument while others are set at an angle to the instrument’s body. Different guitar manufacturers use different headstock pitches, the "magic angle," which range  between angles of  three to 25 degrees. Most guitar manufacturers place their logos on the headstock. Headstocks play other decorative functions as well, as different shaped are signature styles of various guitar manufacturers.
...Read More

Welcome to StrumSchool!


Sign up for free






Why StrumSchool.com?

Easy to Follow

Watch short & sweet videos (5-10 minutes) that will actually teach you something useful.

Tips from the Pros

Learn from masters level musicians with a minimum of 15 years full-time teaching experience.

On the Go

Get anytime access to guitar instruction your computer, tablet & mobile device!

Everything You Need

Master basic guitar fundamentals, chords, scales & your favorite styles of music or song.

Satisfaction Guaranteed

We do everything we can to make our members Happy! That includes our 30 day, no-questions-asked, money-back guarantee.

Learn What you Want

Be heard. We love questions & lesson requests. New articles & videos publish constantly.